Friday

Fad Diets by: Kirsten Hawkins

High-Fat, Low-Carbohydrate Diets - Millions of Americans have joined the low-carb craze and started high-fat, low-carb diets such as the Atkins Diet, and the Zone Diet. They are made up of about 60% fat, 10% carbohydrate, and 30% protein. These diets say you can eat high amounts of fat and protein while getting very low amounts of carbohydrates in the form of vegetables. The main premise of the low-carb diet is that a diet low in carbohydrates leads to a reduction in bodyÕs production of insulin. The end result is that fat and protein stores will be used for energy. So you stuff yourself full of unlimited amounts of meat, cheese, and butter, and only eat a small portion of carbohydrates.

People who start the diet usually lose a great amount of weight, but itÕs not permanent weight loss. Instead of burning fat, the lose water and precious muscle tissue. Furthermore, these diets are low in several nutrients and contain excess amounts of cholesterol and saturated fats, substances that increase the risk of heart disease. Plus, regardless of what they claim, the enormous amounts of protein put a strain on your kidneys.

Moderate Fat Diets - Next, there are the moderate fat diets. Moderate fat diets include diets like Weight Watchers, the USDA Food Guide Pyramid, and Jenny Craig. These diets are made up of about 25% fat, 60% carbohydrate, and 15% protein. They encourage the intake of whole grains, fruits, vegetables, and essential fatty acids found in foods like olive oil and salmon. These diets are usually nutritionally balanced if the dieter eats a variety of foods from all categories. For example, Weight Watchers operates on a point system where foods get a number of points based on calorie, fiber, and fat content. Dieters get a specific amount of points they can use for the day. While itÕs not encouraged, they may choose to spend most of their points on carbohydrates instead of balancing it out. This could lead to deficiencies in nutrients such as calcium, iron, and zinc. However, if followed properly, these diets are probably the most successful for losing weight and keeping it off.

Low and Very Low-Fat Diets - Finally, you have your low-fat and very low-fat diets. Diets in this category include the Dr. Dean OrnishÕs Diet and the Pritkin Plan, among others. They are made up of about 13% fat, 70% carbohydrates, and 16% protein. These diets are mostly vegetarian diets and donÕt recommend eating a lot of meat. Like the low-carb diets, you can eat unlimited amounts of certain foods. Because you canÕt eat a lot of meat, these diets are deficient in zinc, vitamin B12, and essential fatty acids. Also, it is so restrictive that people find a hard time staying on it for life and end up gaining their weight back.

About the author:
Kirsten Hawkins is a nutrition and health expert from Nashville, TN. Visit http://www.popular-diets.com/for more great nutrition, well-being, and vitamin tips as well as reviews and comments on popular diets.

Thursday

The South Beach Diet by: Charlene J. Nuble

Among the most popular forms of dieting is the South Beach diet, developed by cardiologist Arthur Agatston of Miami, Florida.

The South Beach diet is always confused with Atkins Diet, which is a low-carbohydrate diet. The South Beach diet highlights the consumption of “good carbohydrates” (high in fiber) and low in glycemic index. The South Beach diet was developed for patients with heart problems to lose weight without risking ketosis. The weight loss was a side effect which turned out to be beneficial and this encouraged many people to try South Beach diet.

According to the South Beach diet theory, highly processed carbohydrates are quickly digested which makes insulin level to shoot up. Once the carbohydrates are all used up, your high insulin level makes you crave more for carb-filled foods.

The South Beach diet is based on the observation that Americans are carb crazy, which is also the reason for the induction phase. In the first two weeks, dieters attempt to eliminate bad carb such as grains or fruits. After this phase, grain-based foods and fruits are returned to the diet with the concentration on foods with low glycemic index.

The South Beach diet also emphasizes the difference between good and bad carbohydrates, and good and bad fats. Good carbohydrates have low glycemic index which means that they are slowly digested and absorbed. The South Beach diet bans unhealthy fats such as saturated fat.

Finally, the South Beach diet stresses a permanent change in one’s way of eating. The South Beach diet suggests whole grains along with large amounts of vegetables, with sufficient amounts of monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats, plus Omega-3 oils. The South Beach diet discourages eating of overly refined foods such as flour and sugar.

According to experts, the South Beach diet met the criteria of healthy diet which is a good thing. The bad thing is the induction phase wherein dieters lose weight due to loss of water. Losing a large amount of water can disturb one’s electrolyte so if you’re following the South Beach diet, it would be better if you work closely with a doctor.

According to Dr. Agatston, South Beach diet is neither a low carb nor low fat diet but the restrictions placed in the induction phase cut big time the carbohydrate and fat intake of dieters. The good thing about the South Beach diet is that it teaches people on the right foods to eat to cut the risk of heart problems and high cholesterol as well as help them lose weight. The South Beach diet is a long, tedious journey towards perhaps a drop dead gorgeous body. But more than phases of losing weight, the South Beach diet is a way of life.

About the author:
Charlene J. Nuble 2005. For up to date links and information about weight loss, please go to: http://weight-loss.besthealthlink.net/or for updated links and information on all health related topics, go to: http://www.besthealthlink.net/

Wednesday

Atkins and South Beach Diets Compared by: David Teeth

Low-carb diets have been in the market for quite some time now. Two of the most common these days are the Atkins and South Beach Diet.

Beginnings
Both were developed by medical doctors (cardiologists) who -- according to reports -- were trying to help Americans lose weight given their high carb diets.

Atkins Diet was the first to be developed and is thus, the more popular. It was developed by the late Dr. Robert C. Atkins as early as the 1972 but became more widely popular -- despite the oppositions -- in the 1990s.

Dr. Arthur Agatston, also a cardiologist but from Mount Sinai Cardiac Prevention Center in Miami Beach, Fla., is known as the father of the South Beach diet. His work came a lot later through his book: "The South Beach Diet: The Delicious, Doctor-Designed, Foolproof Plan for Fast and Healthy Weight Loss" published in 2003.

Similarities
Both popular diet plans advise dieters to avoid carbohydrates and follow stringent steps to ensure that the significant weight lost during the program does not come back.

Both start with the so-called induction phase where the body of the dieter is "trained" for the routine.

Both diet plans come with suggested food lists where dieters can mix and match foods to suit their tastes. Of course, like other diet plans, both plans advise dieters to stay away from food not included in the lists.

Among the "dont's" in Dr. Atkins' list are fruit, bread, pasta, grains, starchy vegetables, nuts, seeds, legumes, and some dairy products except cheese, cream, and butter.

Aside from fruit, bread, pasta and vegetables, South Beach dieters are also advised to stay away from potatoes, cereal, rice, and corn, especially for the first two weeks of the induction or introductory period. After this period, these can be slowly re-introduced into the body, albeit in smaller amounts.

Both diet plans have a lifetime "maintenance" phase where hopefully dieters will be so accustomed to either plan that they hardly recognize that they are dieting at all.

Differences
While both diet plans restrict carbohydrate intake, the South Beach diet is said to be more forgiving by not totally eliminating carbs. It distinguishes between "good" and "bad" carbs and even "good" and "bad" fats. South Beach encourages intake of "good" carbs and fats.

Low-sugar carbs with low glycemic index are "good" carbs under the South Beach plan. Food rich in fiber are also recommended.

Atkins's diet routine helps the body to burn fat instead of carb. The goal is to help the dieter achieve good health.
Atkins's diet plan involves four phases while the South Beach plan has three phases.

In both plans, the introductory stage aims to condition the body for some changes to prepare for the program.

In Atkins diet, the body is trained to burn fat instead of sugar to help curb the cravings for sugar and break addiction to some foods.

In South Beach diet, the initial phase involves cutting on high-carb foods, which can be gradually re-introduced in small amounts in the next phase. In this case, South Beach debunks myths that this approach prevents dieters from getting healthy mix from all food groups.

Atkins dieters go through the next following phases: ongoing weight loss, pre-maintenance and lifetime maintenance.
The last two phases of South Beach diet are called re-introduce the carb and diet for life.

What's key in the maintenance phase in Atkins is to keep portions of food at small amounts.

Atkins diet guarantees no hunger deprivation because its long-term goal is healthy diet.

South Beach's promise is a "change in the way of eating," with the dieter not recognizing at all that he is on a diet.
Summarizing the Diets

Atkins Diet
Developed by cardiologist Dr. Robert C. Atkins in 1972, with his “Diet Revolution”, a high-protein, high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet.

The program focuses on a low-carbohydrate diet.

The Program has 4 phases:
1. induction phase (train the body to burn fats instead of carb)
2. ongoing weight loss
3. pre-maintenance
4. lifetime maintenance

South Beach Diet
Developed by cardiologist Dr. Arthur Agatston of Miami, Florida, who in 2003, published the book “The South Beach Diet: The Delicious, Doctor-Designed, Foolproof Plan for Fast and Healthy Weight Loss".

The program distinguishes between “good” and “bad” carbohydrates, and “good” and “bad” fats.
Take in “good” carbs and fats.

The program has 3 phases:
1. 2-week introductory or induction phase (strictly no carbs)
2. re-introduce the carbs
3. diet for life

Please check http://www.OnlineDietReview.com for more information.

About the author:
David Teeth is a personal trainer, nutritionist and dietician with years of experience in dieting. David is a full time writer for http://www.onlinedietreview.com/


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Tuesday

Overweight Diet & Fitness "Experts" by: Dr. Donald A. Miller

Diet is a topic much discussed in theory, neglected in practice. I am amused that photos and TV images of most weight loss gurus in USA show them to be "pleasingly plump", that is to say, OVERWEIGHT.

While "juicy" (or "zaftig" or "zoftic") bodies can provide sex appeal in the eyes of some viewers, comparison of health statistics of third generation Asian-Americans to Asian-Asians shows that low fat diets help longevity, and that soy foods increase resistance to numerous diseases.

ALL DIETS THAT WORK for weight loss have one principle in common: If calories burned are more / less than calories ingested, weight will be lost / gained. Physics can NOT be turned off.

** Diet with FACTS, not MYTHS. **

About the author:
Dr. Miller is author of ""Easy Health Diet"" http://easyhealthdiet.com/diet.htm""Exercise for
Juniors to Seniors"" http://easyhealthdiet.com/JrSr.htmand numerous free articles on health http://articles.easyhealthdiet.com/
Seven of ten deaths are caused by preventable diseases.


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Monday

Taking the confusion out of purchasing prescription diet pills. by: Mike West

If you were to search ‘Prescription Diet Pills’ online you would come up with more than 3.5 million results, certainly a large number of results to sort through to find the best prescription diet pill.

The problem is that several diet pills go by many brand names. To take the confusion out of finding prescription diet pills online, http://www.diet-pill-review.com created the following diet pill naming guide.

DIET PILL - Adipex
BRAND NAMES - Adipex-P, Fastin, Ionamin, Obenix, Obephen, Oby-Cap, Oby-trim, Panshape M, Phentercot, Phentermine, Phenteride, Pro-Fast, Teramine, Zantryl.

DIET PILL - Bontril
BRAND NAMES - Bontril-SR, Adipost, Anorex, Appecon, Melfiat, Obezine, Phendimetrazine, Phendiet, Plegine, Prelu, Statobex.

DIET PILL - Didrex
BRAND NAMES - Benzphetamine

DIET PILL - Ionamin
BRAND NAMES - Adipex, Fastin, Obenix, Obephen, Oby-Cap, Oby-trim, Panshape M, Phentercot, Phentermine, Phenteride, Pro-Fast, Teramine, Zantryl

DIET PILL - Meridia
BRAND NAMES - Reductil, Sibutramine

DIET PILL - Phentermine
BRAND NAMES - Phentermine HCI, Phentermine HCL, Phentermine Hydrochloride, Adipex, Fastin, Ionamin, Obenix, Obephen, Oby-Cap, Oby-trim, Panshape M, Phentercot, Phenteride, Pro-Fast, Teramine, Zantryl.

DIET PILL - Tenuate
BRAND NAMES - Diethylpropion, Tenuate Dospan

DIET PILL - Xenical
BRAND NAMES - Orlistat

As you can see, many prescription diet pills take on the same brand name. Adipex, for example- Has several brand names (Adipex-P, Fastin, Ionamin, Obenix, Obephen, Oby-Cap, Oby-trim, Panshape M, Phentercot, Phentermine, Phenteride, Pro-Fast, Teramine, Zantryl), but Ionamin another prescription diet pill also goes by several of the same names (Adipex, Fastin, Obenix, Obephen, Oby-Cap, Oby-trim, Panshape M, Phentercot, Phentermine, Phenteride, Pro-Fast, Teramine, Zantryl) Feel free to use this diet pill guide to read and write reviews at Diet Pill Reviews.


About the author:
Mike West is a studying dietitian and contributing editor for Diet Pill Reviews. For more information, visit http://www.diet-pill-review.com


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